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Music sure has changed since I was a youth. The way we find new music, the way we listen, and the way we share what we’re listening to has all changed; and the political and social climate of today’s culture is reflected in today’s music in a way that has changed massively since 20 years ago*. But I don’t look back and think, “now that was good music!”

“Having an instructor who provided assignment goals that were based on the specific items I wanted to improve with my songwriting, as well as the direct feedback that came with it was hugely helpful. The other element I like was being challenged to finish within deadlines and having accountability — usually when I’m working on things on my own, I tend to get self-critical and shelve things before they’re completed. With this, you have to minimize your level of self-filtering and judgment, trust your instincts, and get things done.” — Colin (Student Artist)

Another key metric you can measure is your follower growth over time. This is important because when listeners follow you, your new releases will automatically show up in their personalized Release Radar playlist. They’ll also get email notifications about shows you’re playing in their city.

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Megastar Ed Sheeran is no stranger to music copyright infringement cases, and unfortunately, neither is his plaintiff. In the latest claim, “the battle of the Eds,” Sheeran is being accused of copying, yet again, Marvin Gaye’s “Let’s Get It On” in “Thinking Out Loud.” He is currently being sued by two different parties: Ed Townsend’s estate (co-writer of “Let’s Get It On”) and Structured Asset Sales, who claim to own a part of Gaye’s song.

Speaking of international recognition, while they may not be an electronic group, per se, Kokono No.1’s approach to technology is reminiscent to early Suicide records, and they exist in a world of their own. At the core of their sound is three electric likembé combined to make a single instrument that is then amplified through home made speakers that illuminates its sound with cracks, pops, and hisses. Their frenetic energy and multitude of singers on each track makes you feel as if you’ve stumbled across them on the streets of Kinshasa.

I’d like to see if you have [dates] available for a show I’m putting together. I’ve reached out to [band 1], [band 2], and [band 3] to headline, and I can lock at least one of them down once we have the venue and date confirmed. I’ve included links to all of the artists’ music and their bios below.

You might feel like your project is ready to tackle your town’s biggest and hippest venues, but the folks who book talent at those places almost certainly feel otherwise. Venues demand that the acts who frequent their stages bring in lots of people because their business models depend on it. But even if you’re certain you’ll be able to draw huge crowds for your first local shows, you should still look for modest places to play when you’re just starting out.

In some of the earlier works on this list, we’ve heard the theremin produce quartertones, reverberated sci-fi soundscapes, dissonance, and virtuosity. But here, it’s just plain pretty. In fact, it’s simply beautiful! The theremin holds center stage here showing yet another timbral side to the instrument: its angelic, siren, somnambulant quality and characteristics.

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Modes and Key Signatures have a variety of different characteristics and are great for outside-the-box songwriting. Here’s a cheat sheet to remember them!

He’s a virtual reality pioneer, a software humanist, a former rock musician and student of classical music. No surprise that Koosha’s current experimental electronic music embraces paradoxes. It’s chaotic, but reveals deep compositional intent. It’s futuristic while feeling nostalgic. It’s kitsch as well as sincerely melancholic. Born in Tehran and now based in London, he courts a vaporwave aesthetic and is firmly in the sonic vanguard of ambient sound. He has a bunch of stuff up on Bandcamp and the latest Stamina is a good place to start.

The form here is seemingly as sparse as the accompaniment, and it’s just about the most “organic” thing I’ve seen so far in this study. After eight bars of verse, he introduces what will be the refrain lines (you really can’t call it a chorus because it’s only two lines over four bars). But then there’s a big stretch of verse at a non-standard, “just-feeling-it-that way” 36 bars, and then, just cutting this dough with his fingernails (as in, no pre-made cookie-cutter shapes), Drake gives us six bars of the “my head is spinning” sample, followed by, for some reason, only one of the refrain lines? Then there’s eight more bars of the sample and, following that, a mammoth verse section weighing in at 56 bars. To close it out, we get that refrain/sample combo again, but this time it’s punctuated with the first refrain line, and then the next line. Pretty innovative organization.

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few testimonials of Soundfly’s Orchestration For Strings course directly from our students.

I don’t know what it is about this West Virginia University hub, but I have found time and time again that even bands without a huge national following can attract a packed, excited crowd in Morgantown. People just can’t get enough music here, and they’re welcoming enough to give you a shot and come to your show even if they’ve never heard your music. Plus, with West Virginia’s proximity to Pittsburgh, Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Columbus (not to mention all the other secret hot spots in Ohio), it’s an easy detour that will surely be worth the trip.